Organic Fair Trade Dried Edible Flowers

Every purchase changes lives.

One person purchases edible flowers.
The next person benefits from that purchase.
A hungry person gets to eat.

The best nourishment is Selflessness.
Feed yourself with Trust and Generosity.
Taste with Good Will.

Welcome to the World of Flowers!
Flowers are edible, beautiful and elegant.

‘Humanity will be saved by the flower”
– Mayan prophecy

The history of edible flowers as food dates back thousands of years, with the first recorded mention in 140 B.C. Many different cultures have incorporated flowers into their traditional foods. Ancient Chinese, Roman, Greek, Indian, Hindus, Aztecs, Incas, English, Egyptians, Spanish, and Middle Eastern have made detailed recordings about various edible flowers used in authentic food preparations and traditional rituals. Historically, flower petals served as chief food garnishes in salads and sauces. The petals of flowers like Carnation, Borage, Sage, Bee Balm, Nasturtium, Violet, Daylily and Calendula were commonly eaten because they were known for their medicinal properties. Dry flower petals of Jasmine, Bee Balm, Rose and Hibiscus were used for tea blending.

All botanicals offered are tested for pesticide residues and are free of irradiation, ozone, synthetic pesticides, chemical fertilizers, sulfur, gas, chemical treatment, and unsustainable agricultural practices. Each batch is inspected in an on-site laboratory in America with strict quality control, are wild-harvested in a sound and sustainable manner, and are organic and Fair Trade Certified. Careful attention is given to every botanical offered, painstakingly hand-selected from the finest harvests all over the world.

Edible Flowers1

NOTE: Before eating any flower, you need to make sure it is edible. As a general rule, assume any flower from a florist, nursery or garden center is not edible, as those are nearly always heavily treated with pesticides. The same goes for flowers you find near a roadside or in any garden that has been treated with chemicals. Stick to organically grown flowers or those that you grow yourself (without pesticides/herbicides).

Some flowers, even organic ones, can may you sick if eaten. Be careful about eating flowers if you have hay fever, asthma or allergies. Gradually introduce a flower into your diet to be sure. Daphne, foxglove, daffodils and hyacinths are just a few examples of poisonous flowers that should not be used for food purposes. There are many varieties other than what is mentioned here. Use your common sense and research. Consult a reference book on edible flowers, or ask an expert in this area, before branching out further, and if you aren’t sure, don’t eat it!

Flowers are light-weight; a little goes a long way. Packaged in 100% recycled, resealable flat bottom bag.

sunflower copy

Calendula/Marigold

A great flower for eating, calendula blossoms are peppery, tangy and spicy, their vibrant golden color adding dash to any dish. In American Civil War, the flowers were used to treat open wounds. In India, wreaths were placed around the necks of gods and goddesses. Bright orange whole flower.
1.15 oz. $12

Add to Cart

Calendula

Chamomile

Small and daisy-like, the flowers have a sweet flavor and are often used in tea. A traditional remedy for lulling one into relaxation and sleep and for upset tummies. Pale yellow tiny flower buds.  (Ragwood sufferers may be allergic to chamomile.)
1.7 oz. $12

Add to Cart

Chamomile

Chrysanthemum 

An ancient Chinese proverb says that “if you would like to be happy for a lifetime, grow chrysanthemums”. They still rank as one of the most important herbs in traditional Japanese medicine; they are thought to have the power of life. Creamy white whole flowers.
1.05 oz. $12

Add to Cart

Chrysanthemum

Cornflower

The cornflower gets its formal name from Chiron, a renowned herbalist in Greek mythology, credited with teaching mankind about the healing power of herbs. Cornflower has been used medicinally for its astringent and antiseptic properties. They were named Bachelor’s Buttons in Victorian England because young women would wear them as a sign of availability. Bright blue with some white flower petals.
1 oz. $13

Add to Cart

Cornflower

Helichrysum 

Part of the ‘Immortalle’ family, they are collected before they open for herbal use to make aromatic, spicy, and slightly bitter teas. The name is derived from Greek: helios meaning sun, and chrysos meaning gold. It is said they have a high levels of anti-oxidants and are used as an aphrodisiac in South Africa. Creamy yellow whole flower clusters.
1.15 oz. $12

Add to Cart

Helichrysum

Hibiscus

Famously used in tea, the vibrant cranberry-like flavor is tart and can be used sparingly. There are many folk remedies attributed to hibiscus flowers, including help with digestion and soothing nerves, and have high levels of anti-oxidants. They are also the main ingredient in wonderfully refreshing teas made around the world. Red flower petals.
2.75 oz. $12

Add to Cart

Hibiscus

Honeysuckle

Honeysuckle is said to be the living symbol of love. Used in Asia medicinally for thousands of years, honeysuckle is an anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory, anti-spasmodic, and diuretic. The fragrance is said to induce dreams of passion and love. Light green flower petals.
1.6 oz. $16

Add to Cart

Honeysuckle

Jasmine 

These super-fragrant blooms are used in tea and sweet dishes, but sparingly. They are known for their subtle beauty and aroma. In different cultures, jasmine represents feminine kindness, grace and delicacy, as well as attracting wealth and romance, and are used in religious ceremonies. Jasmine are used for its relaxing qualities. Creamy white flower buds.
1.7 oz. $12

Add to Cart

Jasmine

Lavender 

Sweet, spicy and perfumed, the flowers are a great addition to both savory and sweet dishes. Their history goes back thousands of years, used by Egyptians, Greeks and Romans, for bathing, cooking, in perfume, and healing wounds. During the Great Plague of 1665, grave robbers washed their hands in a concoction called “Four Thieves”, containing a mix of lavender with three other herbs, which protected them from disease. Folklore tells that lavender attracts fairies and elves. Purple flower petals.
1.75 oz. $12

Add to Cart

Lavender

Red Clover

Red clover blossoms are a native plant of North Africa, Asia and Europe. They have been used medicinally to treat a wide variety of conditions, many having to do with reproductive functions. Druids believed that they could ward off evil spells and witches. Native Americans used these as a salve for burns. Pink whole flowers.
1 oz. $13

Add to Cart

Red Clover

Rose Petals

The rose has been valued for its beauty and its perfume for thousands of years. The American Botanical Council reports they have sedative, antiseptic, anti-parasitic, anti-inflammatory, laxative, cholesterol-lowering, and heart-supportive properties. Roses are a beautiful symbol of love. Red flower petals.
1.5 oz. $15

Add to Cart

roses

Sunflower

In Greek mythology, the sunflower came to be because a water nymph, in unrequited love with the sun god Apollo, watched him from dawn to dusk, and soon she transformed into the golden sunflower. Native Americans are believed to have used the sunflower for more than 3,000 years. The flowers contain protein and Vitamins D, E, K, and B.  Yellow flower petals.
1.4 oz. $12

Add to Cart

Sunflower